Hibiscus Syrup

This fruity syrup can be used on wheat-free pancakes or drizzled over yogurt. Use it to sweeten tea or mix it with rum and soda water. Get creative!

Allergy Notes:

Miracle of miracles! There is nothing in this actual recipe that you need to be concerned about related to latex fruit syndrome, just read the ingredients carefully on anything you might serve it with or on, and as always, speak with your allergist about the safest way to try foods that are new to you. (If you’ve had a passion tea at Starbucks, or Jamaica at a Mexican restaurant, you have had hibiscus before.)

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Hibiscus Syrup
This fruity syrup has no fruit and is tangy-sweet and delicious. Whip up this easy-to-make recipe in no time and use it anywhere you would normally use syrup.
Hibiscus syrup ready to serve
Course Condiment
Prep Time 45 mins
Servings
cups of syrup
Ingredients
Course Condiment
Prep Time 45 mins
Servings
cups of syrup
Ingredients
Hibiscus syrup ready to serve
Instructions
  1. Preheat a dry, non-stick pan over medium-high heat. Toast the cardamom pods for about 1 minute until fragrant, stirring frequently. Gently crush the toasted pods with the side of a knife to release the seeds. Set aside.
  2. In the same pan, toast the cloves until fragrant, about 1 minute; then set aside.
  3. Bring 2 cups of water to a boil in a 2-quart sauce pan.
  4. Reduce heat until gently boiling. Add the dried hibiscus and spices, and continue to boil for 1 minute.
  5. Turn off heat and allow to steep for about 30 minutes.
  6. Strain the hibiscus and spices out by pouring the liquid into a bowl through a mesh strainer.
  7. Return the liquid to the pot, and wisk in the sugar.
  8. Bring the syrup to a boil, reduce heat and boil gently for 4 minutes, stirring constantly.
  9. Remove from heat and allow to stand until syrup reaches room temperature. Pour into a sterile jar and store in the refrigerator.
Recipe Notes

My recipes avoid all ingredients listed on the American Latex Allergy Association website, and on Japan's National Institute of Health Sciences website, as known for or suspected of cross-reacting with latex as well as a few other ingredients that I have discovered elsewhere. However, latex-fruit syndrome is still an emerging issue and poorly understood. There may be other foods that cross-react, and people with latex-fruit syndrome often have other food allergies independent of their latex allergy. Each individual is different, so be sure to discuss with your allergist the safest way for you to try out ingredients that are new to you before you cook with them.

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