Cranberry-Hibiscus Relish

This relish is a great addition to your Thanksgiving or winter holiday meal. It is best when made ahead, and you can make it a couple of days ahead to manage the holiday cooking load. If you don’t already have hibiscus syrup on hand (as, of course you really should), be sure to plan that into your prep time.

I also love to eat this relish over homemade pumpkin ice cream or plain Greek yogurt for a snack. Enjoy!

Allergy Notes:

None of the ingredients in this recipe are known to cross-react with latex, so you just need to be sure to read the ingredients on anything you serve this with or on. As always, be sure to talk to your allergist about the best way to try any foods that are new to you. (If you’ve had a passion tea at Starbucks, or Jamaica at a Mexican restaurant, you have had hibiscus before.)

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Cranberry-Hibiscus Relish
This relish can take the place of cranberry sauce in holiday meals. Since the cranberries are raw, the relish has a completely different mouth-feel than cranberry sauce. It's a fun way to mix things up without straying too far from the traditional meal.
Bowl with cranberry relish ready to serve
Cuisine American
Prep Time 10 minutes
Passive Time 8 hours
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Cuisine American
Prep Time 10 minutes
Passive Time 8 hours
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Bowl with cranberry relish ready to serve
Instructions
  1. Wash cranberries and place in a food processor.
  2. Add the hibiscus syrup and pulse until the cranberries are finely chopped. The mixture should be a deep, almost-red pink, but don't turn it into a liquid.
  3. Place the mixture into a storage container and sample. Stir in more hibiscus syrup, 1 tablespoon at a time, as desired.
  4. Store in the refrigerator for at least 8 hours before serving.
Recipe Notes

My recipes avoid all ingredients listed on the American Latex Allergy Association website, and on Japan's National Institute of Health Sciences website, as known for or suspected of cross-reacting with latex as well as a few other ingredients that I have discovered elsewhere. However, latex-fruit syndrome is still an emerging issue and poorly understood. There may be other foods that cross-react, and people with latex-fruit syndrome often have other food allergies independent of their latex allergy. Each individual is different, so be sure to discuss with your allergist the safest way for you to try out ingredients that are new to you before you cook with them.

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